Welcome to the New Market Historical Society

We are dedicated to increasing public understanding and enthusiasm for our local history and preservation.  Our mission is to provide a central location, where we can store, introduce, interpret, and stimulate the study of local history. Our goals are to tell Newmarket’s story, preserve its local artifacts, and sponsor historical events and educational opportunities.  Please consult our program of events for exact dates, times, and locations for our meetings and events. 

The public is always welcome to attend our educational meetings, which are free except for select special events.

Donations are always welcomed and greatly appreciated!


Join us during our 2019 year long celebration of

Newmarket’s Immigrant Families & Their Stories

With special programs, stories, letters, photographs, news articles, and textiles dedicated to refugees, and immigrant families from Ireland, French Canada, Poland, Laos, Italy, Russia, and Germany … those who came and changed the fabric of the town.

The New Market Historical Society recently began a family genealogy section with information supplied by town residents over the years, as well as those created through our own research.  People from across the country have contacted us looking for family connections and have submitted their own family trees as well, which are now housed in the Stone School Museum.

We welcome all our members and visitors to share their family stories of  journey and struggle. 

We invite you to join us each Wednesday night during the Month of May between 6 - 8 p.m. at the Newmarket Library where we will interview and film those willing to share their stories of how their ancestors came to the country and to town.  Newmarket resident David Smith will edit all the interviews into a program  for the Historical Society and the Library, which will be shown next year.

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Check our events page for a schedule of  our 2019 programs….

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The Stone School Museum is now closed for the season.

Our summer open hours are:

June, July and August — Sundays from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. to coincide with the Newmarket Farmers’ Market held again this year between the Stone School and the Stone Church.

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We will be open on Sunday, June 2nd at 10 a.m. during the Raid Rockingham 2019 Bike Ride.

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April 10th is the anniversary of the disastrous dive of the USS Thresher and the death of all 129 men aboard. 

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One of those who perished off the coast of Cape Cod was Richard Fisher, a former teacher at Newmarket High School 1960-1961.

This fall a memorial will be placed in Arlington National Cemetery honoring all those who died aboard the nuclear submarine. 

For our personal remembrance of Mr. Fisher please see the Biography Section of our website.   

http://www.newmarketnhhistoricalsociety.org/docs/biographies/remembering-richard-fisher/

   

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Coming Next on April 29, 2019 :

BEFORE THE EARLIEST IMMIGRANTS: A STORY MAP -- INDIGENOUS NEW HAMPSHIRE

 The Interactive Map of New Hampshire’s Native Americans

Also:  Who were our first English settlers—the first immigrants to Newmarket?

Indigenous New Hampshire” is a collaboration between the University of New Hampshire Anthropology Department, Denise and Paul Pouliot of the Cowasuck Band of the Pennacook Abenaki People, local historians, archaeologists, and participants of different educational backgrounds. This long-term project intends to reframe New Hampshire’s history from an Indigenous perspective. During the 1600s, settler communities rapidly grew larger. Many Europeans considered the Indigenous peoples to be living in poverty and compared them to England’s beggars (Cronon 1983: 33). This perception was largely based on how Indigenous communities utilized the land. What many settlers failed to recognize was that New England’s abundance of resources was a direct result of Indigenous peoples’ use of the land during the precolonial period. (Cronon 1983, 80)”      — from the Interactive Map website      

See all events


Stone School Museum

The Stone School Museum, built in 1841, as a two-room schoolhouse, and now home to the New Market Historical Society, is located high upon Zion’s Hill on Granite Street.  Hours of operation are in our program of events and are on our web page and Facebook.  If you need further information, please call 603-659-3289 and leave a message or via email at newmarketnh.historicalsociety@gmail.com. Your inquiry will be returned as soon as possible.


Newmarket (Images of America) 

The Historical Society still has books at early release prices:

$17 for members, $19 for non-members

Books available and can be purchased on line with PayPal—or contact us via email at

newmarketnh.historicalsociety@gmail.com

If shipped — an additional shipping & handling fee of $4 applies.

 All proceeds from the sale of this book by the New Market Historical Society help  the preservation of our collection.


Support Historical Society!

Become a Member
or donate any amount

We greatly appreciate your membership and donations, and look forward to seeing you at our meetings and events. Members receive free admission to all our meetings and non-members can attend most meetings and events for free. Please make it a point to introduce someone new to one of our events.